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"Faust. Der Tragödie erster Teil" (kurz Faust I) von Johann Wolfgang von Goethe gilt als das bedeutendste und meistzitierte Werk der deutschen Literatur. Die veröffentlichte Tragödie greift die Geschichte des historischen Doktor Faustus auf. from "Faust" by Johann Wolfgang Goethe It is very important to realize the great importance of water in the cosmic events, so that life and fertility can be. Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Drama, European | Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von, Brooks, Charles Timothy | ISBN: | Kostenloser. Faust calls itself "A Tragedy" right enough, but it might just as well be described as a musical comedy -- it's ripe with comic passages, features many songs, and. Damals auf "Polydor" als Clear Vinyl im durchsichtigen Cover erschienen wurde dies zu einem der schwerer zugänglichen Klassiker des sogannten.

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Faust (In Our Time)

Thus, as wonderful as the experience was, I did not get a chance to absorb all of the detail and nuances of the story.

I plan to read the complete Faust Parts 1 and 2 in the future and will share my thoughts on the work as a whole at that time. Faust is visited by Mephistopheles and offered a life of hedonistic excess and earthly pleasures as a means of gaining greater understanding of the universe.

Faust, who apparently had never watched any episodes of The Twilight Zone , foolishly agrees and bargains away his soul. It was this relationship that I thought received the shortest shrift in the adaptation that I listened to so I will leave further thoughts on this until I have experienced the complete work.

The language is gorgeous and drips emotion on almost every line. Some might think this falls too far into the realm of melodrama, but I loved it and found it vigorous and passionate.

The end is wonderful with the necessary questions answered but certain larger queries left for us to contemplate.

A wonderful experience abridged though it may have been and one that I strongly encourage everyone to read.

Am I to name myself or not? View all 16 comments. Aug 23, James rated it really liked it Shelves: 4-written-preth-century , 1-fiction.

I read Johann Goethe 's Faust in English and partially in German during a college course many years ago. It had a huge impact on me as a person and me as a writer.

Due to it being somewhat "out there," I held back a full 5 rating; however, I cannot stress how much this book makes you think.

Beware, it's a little heavy on the literary side, but it's still worth a read, even if you just read the first portion. That said, 4 out of 5 stars My room was quiet because everyone else was already asleep.

I was able to read and consciously take in the contents of the work. As I began reading the first part, I was a bit disturbed by the fact that it was not in prose, but that it was in poetical verse.

I have never been a great fan of poetry as a genre of literature. I wanted to learn something from the story, as I do from all literature.

When I skimmed Faust for the first time, I tried to read it for pleasure, but it was a little too hard. I needed to stop and understand what as going on in each scene.

However, I soon realized that I was able to place myself inside the text in several different ways. It was at this point that Faust actually appealed to me; I saw myself in the novel as the character of Faust, fighting against the devilish Mephistopheles.

I have always struggled with wanting everything from material things to the admiration of others. As a man of flesh and blood, I naturally want great intelligence, power and love.

I have always wanted to be number one - a perfectionist - just like Faust. So, while I was reading Faust, I was truly reading a biography of my own life, albeit on a much larger scale.

I too have lost some faith in my religion, and I wonder if I will be saved; however, unlike Faust, at the time I read it, I had yet to want someone as much as he wanted Margaret Gretchen.

I do have the addictive personality that would lead me in the same direction as Faust. With all of this in mind, I read through the novel as though I were Faust.

I took on his persona, argued with Mephistopheles, and wished that I had never been born in the end of the work. It is not easy to live a life completely free from the clutches of evil.

When you are hopeless and in despair, you need help. Often, humans are not strong enough to recognize from whom they are getting help.

Faust is a man worthy of my admiration. All throughout the book, both Faust and the actions he sought fascinated me. Like I said before, I felt as though I was reading or watching a movie of my own life.

It was as though a dream had come true where I was able to align myself with the devil. I was able to see what would happen if I took on the persona of evil incarnate turned into man.

Faust enabled me to have an out of body experience where I could see what would happen to me if I became what I have always been curious about becoming: A devil-influenced man.

Throughout the work of Faust by Goethe, I was able to live experiences vicariously. Faust enabled me to try things that I only dreamed about trying.

I really felt as though I were reading a novel about myself. I think that this is why the Faustian theme has persisted throughout time; men and women everywhere have struggled within themselves fighting between good and evil to achieve their goals and desires.

I am no different. About Me For those new to me or my reviews I write A LOT. Leave a comment and let me know what you think.

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Many thanks to their original creators. View all 6 comments. Aug 10, E. View 1 comment. Sounds good? Faust : You had me at "hook up with a minor",bro.

View 2 comments. Jun 01, Greta rated it liked it Shelves: german-literature , classics. Per definition poetry is literature that evokes a concentrated imaginative awareness of experience or a specific emotional response through language chosen and arranged for its meaning, sound, and rhythm.

I had a look at a englisch translation and depending on the translator, the writing still might have some rhythm, sound and meaning to it- but you are not reading Faust.

The characters motives, expressions and even the content of the story differ from what Goethe intended to express. It misses depth, it misses purpose, it misses meaning.

View all 5 comments. If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Dear friend, all theory is gray, and green the golden tree of life.

What else to say? Towering as an archetype, akin to Hamlet, the Inferno and White Whale -- this tale of pact has been absorbed into a our cultural bones, like an isotope.

It is more telling to consider that I listened to Tavener while reading this. I recently gave Pandora a spin but found that I owned more Schnittke than was afforded by my"station" but if I leave such, will I miss those Penn Station ads?

I will say that I should'v Dear friend, all theory is gray, and green the golden tree of life. I will say that I should've read my Norton critical edition, well actually, my wife's copy -- the one I bought for her in Columbus, Ohio ten years ago.

I went with a standard Penguin copy and I'm sure many of the historic references were lost for me. No one should consider that I regard Faust as emblematic of power politics in the US or a possible Brexit across the water.

I'm too feeble for such extrapolation. Sep 25, poncho rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , read-in It was assigned to me when I was in middle school for my Spanish class.

I chose, however, this play by Goethe, having no idea what it was about. Instead, I got interested in such delightful activities for two main reasons.

Heinrich Faust, the main character in this poetic play. I think Goethe's point was to make an emphasis in this lack of something in human understanding and that no matter how hard we try there'll be always something greater than us that we won't be able to understand with our minds designed for only three dimensions, like Ivan Karamazov said.

He says the Universe isn't perfect since Man still feels miserable. Therefore, there are many converging points in both books, but they differ from each other.

So Faust is a very learned man who has studied everything that ever existed, and yet he still feels he's missing something about existence, something that isn't written down in those books and that perhaps cannot be put to words.

He then expresses the words that have become famous because of their depth and their importance in this work: 'Two souls, alas, dwell in my breast, each seeks to rule without the other.

And it's the Spirit who lowers this learned man to his human condition, making him aware of his delimited understanding. Faust, however, persists and trying to prove his godliness, he tries to commit suicide, when suddenly the the church bells ring and an angelic choir from above is heard, announcing Christ's resurrection.

The agreement is settled with blood. Then he meets Gretchen, also known as Margaret, and that's what Faust's misery gets worse — and even worse for Gretchen, who before meeting Faust and his horrid companion was such a pure creature that at first Mephisto does not think he can get her.

Faust blames Mephistopheles for distracting him at the Walpurus Night instead of taking him to save Gretchen.

This is when I realised Goethe used Mephisto to point out the flaws of our minds, sometimes in earnest, sometimes in jest, like people's tendency to blame external, sometimes supernatural causes for their mistakes.

I'm afraid Goethe wrote the second part until the last year of his life. I'm not as learned as Doctor Faust, but I think I found in reading this book the kind of fervor he was looking for.

Illustrated by Goethe himself. View all 11 comments. There's something discomforting about the vague moral convictions of Goethe's Faust character.

One would assume, that even a scholar living in Goethe's time would find the typical preoccupations of Christian morality somewhat boring, if not basically delusional and overzealous.

After all, the cacophony of self-doubt racing through his mind is not initially brought on by anything that resembles religious guilt. He's a man plagued by the hermetic stuffiness of a lifestyle of perpetual deep thought There's something discomforting about the vague moral convictions of Goethe's Faust character.

He's a man plagued by the hermetic stuffiness of a lifestyle of perpetual deep thought. All of his forced questions about the complexity of the universe have not been adequately revealed to him in the immense amount of reading and study that he has undertaken throughout the course of his life.

Something is missing. In the opening soliloquy he desperately gropes out loud in an attempt to locate the source of his emptiness.

He intones Oh, but nothing more. Where can I grasp you, never-ending Nature? Breasts, where? You founts of all of life, That earth and heaven hang upon love And where the parched soul craves to be, You flow, you give to drink, but not to me.

In the beginning it's difficult to tell whether Faust harbors any faith in God. Faust desires some sort of ineffable experience; he desires a base inflammation of the senses, most importantly of his own passion for life.

It could be argued that Mephistopheles appears essentially because Faust desires to lose himself in sublime sinfulness.

God might only show up to suggest that his mortal frustrations and complex questions can in fact be answered, but only by one book.

More importantly, if it were for the grace of God's true presence in Faust's existence, his questions would abate under the reverent awe of his own faith.

It's obviously not there. It's at this point that Mephistopheles appears, offering what any average mortal would desire in the throes of their own suffering, brought on by an overwhelming abundance of probing, difficult questions; namely the earthly pleasures of amorous love.

To be clear, Gretchen's character is offered to Faust to appease the longings of his heart more than that of his loins.

Having the position and immortal power that Mephistopheles does, he understands that Faust will be more than willing to accept his wager. But, as most critics suggest, Mephistopheles also knows that a character such as Faust, despite not really being a man of faith, will ruin such an immediate route to happiness.

Naturally, Gretchen detects the way in which this internal struggle of Faust's causes him to be so distant. Not only that, but she distrusts Mephistopheles, and is committed to God.

There is a clunky and somewhat fragmented quality to the way that Goethe presents many of the difficult concerns of Faust and his wager with Mephistopheles.

Initially, he is so troubled, merely by the thought that all of his worldly academic efforts are made in vain. His frustration with the futility of his effort to enlighten himself and to better understand the beautiful complexity of the world, reaches a sort of peak, at which point he loses faith in virtually everything.

At first amused by the idea of the very appearance of Mephistopheles, he's eventually perplexed by how effortlessly he can access the very happiness which he could hardly even give a name to.

Is he, in this sense, troubled once again by the knowledge that he possesses, the knowledge of the disappointing outcome of his temporary pleasures?

One could almost draw a parallel to Nietzsche's description of the existential frustration that cripples Shakespeare's Hamlet from acting on his anger due to the knowledge that he has of the awful situation occurring around him.

To an atheist, especially an academic one, virtually all of this might sound a little silly. The reality of the situation is that Mephistopheles is actually quite fun.

As he says in response to Faust's question of who Mephistopheles is, "A part of the power who wills evil always but always works the good.

This might sound confusing to some, but what he's doing is mockingly suggesting to Faust that his attachment to traditional notions of sin and goodliness is ridiculous.

Toward the end, Faust ignorantly insists that the wager is destined to end in despair and disappointment. Mephistopheles, already aware of how seemingly full of disappointment most mortal situations might appeal to human beings, basically has a little fun with Faust's misguided convictions of goodness.

So then is this a tragedy? Toward the end of the first part of Goethe's morally confusing masterpiece, it becomes increasingly difficult to believe that there is anything tragic about the fate of Faust.

Sep 11, Michael Finocchiaro rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction , classics , germanth-c , favorites. Goethe's Faust, particularly the first part is one of the monuments of western literature.

The characters of Mephisto, Faust and Margarite and unforgettable. It has, of course inspired operas from Berlioz to Busoni and books writers such as Thomas Mann.

It was actually adapted from an earlier version by Christopher Marlowe but Goethe's version is even more sinister and lifelike. May 18, Duffy Pratt rated it it was ok.

Who knew that this book, one of the most famous in literature, was actually two separate works that seem only slightly related?

I certainly didn't. The first part is a fairly ordinary play that gets dunked in profundity through the inclusion of Mephistopheles. There are only a few main characters here, and there wasn't much depth to any of them.

I've heard that the German is tremendously good, but it's impossible for me to judge. I switched back and forth in this part between two different trans Who knew that this book, one of the most famous in literature, was actually two separate works that seem only slightly related?

I switched back and forth in this part between two different translations. I liked the free kindle version better than my Oxford edition, but I wasn't really taken in with the language of either, except in some small parts.

On its own, I have to say that I enjoyed the first part. The second part is unlike anything I've ever read. If I didn't know that it had been invented in my lifetime, I'd swear that Goethe got himself into some very, very fine LSD.

It's very weird, jumps all over the place, and gives the impression that anything, no matter how fantastical, could be made to occur.

It feels like it could never be produced as a play. There are way too many speakers -- I hesitate to call any of them characters. In this second part, a mood might start talking, or a mythological creature, or an inanimate object, or anything at all for that matter.

And I have no idea how, if staged, anyone would know which "character" was speaking at any time. Unless, like in a childrens play, Thales or Speed-Booty, wore a placard saying who he was.

The stage directions can be just as dumbfounding. At one point, one direction says: "To the younger members of the audience who did not applaud.

What if the entire audience applauded? It is one of the stranger directions I've ever seen in a play, and it made me think that Goethe may have been over a hundred years ahead of his time.

Or maybe he just realized that this was a "play" that would only ever be read, and he was just having some fun with the directions.

Ultimately, this work is a long piece of lyric poetry, and I'm willing to accept that in German it is remarkably great poetry.

I suppose that people who don't speak English might have just as hard a time figuring out what's so great about Shakespeare, and that makes me sad.

But, reading Proust made me decide to learn French. I never felt anything like that tug towards German while reading Faust.

View all 4 comments. Oct 12, Sophia rated it it was amazing. Ironically, Faust reveals his disapproval for books as a true source of knowledge in understanding the world; we must turn to life and living, and experience instead.

I call this ironic because while he denounces books, Faust is a book. Mar 19, Christopher rated it it was amazing Shelves: drama , fiction , 19th-century , classics , german.

Not since watching Breaking Bad have I been so enthralled by a man's descent into depravity. What a tragedy! How beautifully, subtly crafted. This was one of the most heart wrenching books I've read in a long time.

Jan 30, Ivana Books Are Magic rated it liked it. I did like the first part more than the second one, but I must admit that I prefer the Marlowe's version.

I suppose that is a very plain way of putting it, but there it is. I do see why Goethe's Faust is a classic.

It is a highly praised book and deserving so. It is in many ways a timeless work, but it is not one of my favourite ones.

Personally, I couldn't connect with this work of art on a deeper level. Faust is known for the power of its language.

Some of it might be lost in translation, I ca I did like the first part more than the second one, but I must admit that I prefer the Marlowe's version.

Some of it might be lost in translation, I cannot be the judge of that. I read this book in translation, I had to. I don't read in German and I doubt I will ever learn the language.

The full brilliance of original verse will probably remain lost to me. However, even in translation Goethe's Faust has great poetic power.

That's definitely my favourite thing about Faust. The first part of Faust has some amazingly beautiful verses! Potent and beautiful verses are always something to be admired.

I wish that I could say that I was as impressed by the content as I was with the form, but I cannot.

The story is too abstract, it is quite high paced at times and yet not in a way I like, sometimes it is confusing. It seemed to me that Faust does not have the dept I was looking for in it.

Perhaps I just didn't know how to find it. Still, it wasn't as meaningful and layered as I would except for this type of writing. Moreover, the character of Faust was not clear to me, I felt nothing for him, I had no sense of his character development.

I didn't like the ending much, either. There were some really meaningful lines here and there, yet I did not have that sense of a great and tragic soul- there was something almost mediocre about this Faust.

In addition, the dialogues between him and Mephistopheles were not as witty as I expected. I do not mind the fact that this is a hybrid between a play and an extended poem.

Neither do I have anything against the literary period it was written in. It's simply that I think it could be better.

At one point of reading Faust I was even bored, so I tried imagining it on the stage- in my mind it worked. I wonder what it would really look like on stage.

I know it is a popular play, despite the fact that it was written as a closet drama. Although it is quite long, I do not really see it as a closet drama.

In my opinion the best part of the Faust is the poetry, the form, the language- in that aspect the play is a complete success. The content didn't impress me as such.

At times Faust was great, at times boring, I don't know how to put it any other way. I expected more. David Constantine's translation modernizes this amazing piece of High German lit, but George Madison Priest's translation seems, at least to me, to have a more seductive flow and more tempting poetry.

Mar 03, Olivia-Savannah Roach rated it liked it. This was assigned reading for university. I was quite confused and disconnected from the play as I read it.

Although I did understand and could follow what was happening, I was lost as to the relevance of the play. I did not enjoy reading it.

But then I continued on to analysing the play and studying it - and there was where I discovered its worth, the themes it discusses and could appreciate the wit and aim of the play more.

But it still couldn't be counted as an enjoyable or very enlightening This was assigned reading for university. But it still couldn't be counted as an enjoyable or very enlightening read for me personally.

Philosophy, blasphemy, sorcery, seduction, murder and orgy—oh my! But if such things were in the works to ensure that when I did read this book I would be mos Philosophy, blasphemy, sorcery, seduction, murder and orgy—oh my!

But if such things were in the works to ensure that when I did read this book I would be most capable of appreciating its saturate brilliance, I gladly do not regret them.

The young man who might have then read Faust would have lacked the perspective of the living, the loving, the suffering, reading, writing and especially meditating the intervening years were.

The world of the spirit is not sealed; Your mind is shut, your soul is dead! Awake my son, and all unwearied Bathe in the dawn of your mortal breast!

See Article History. Read More on This Topic. Work on Faust accompanied Goethe throughout his adult life. Of a possible plan in to dramatize the story of Learn More in these related Britannica articles:.

Of a possible plan in to dramatize the story of the man who sold his soul to the Devil in exchange for earthly fulfillment, perhaps including his ultimate redemption, no firm evidence survives.

German literature: Weimar Classicism: Goethe and Schiller. Reed puts it in his biography Goethe of Goethe and Schiller and is considered the culmination of German literature.

Modern critics have described long poems such as T. History at your fingertips. Sign up here to see what happened On This Day , every day in your inbox!

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Graphic Novel paperback: Faust: Der Tragödie erster Teil [Flix, Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von] on u2bat.be *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Graphic. Faust. Eine Tragödie. (auch Faust. Der Tragödie erster Teil oder kurz Faust I) von Johann Wolfgang von Goethe gilt als das bedeutendste und meistzitierte Werk. Download Citation | Lesarten von Goethes Faust by Ulrich Gaier, and: Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Faust: Eine Tragödie, Erster Theil, Frühere Fassung ("Urfaust")​. Faust. Eine Tragödie. von. Goethe. Tübingen. in der J. G. Cotta'schen Buchhandlung. [3].

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Und wer nicht denkt, Dem wird sie geschenkt, Er hat sie ohne Sorgen. Habe nun, ach! Faust bricht den Tanz ab, als seiner Partnerin ein rotes Mäuschen aus dem Mund springt und ihm ein blasses, schönes Kind erscheint, das ihn an Gretchen erinnert und ein rotes Schnürchen um den Hals trägt eine Vorausdeutung auf Gretchens Hinrichtung. Nicht irdisch ist des Thoren Trank noch Speise. Eine Tragödie. Ich wäre gern bey meines Gratis Spiele Skat Ohne Anmeldung. Wie oft, ach! Und für die Stadt was thut denn er? Und sind Politik Online Spiel leicht, so geht es schnell hinauf; Ich gratulire dir zum neuen Lebenslauf! It is not easy to live a life completely free from the clutches of evil. He Sehnsucht Disco hope and faith, and asks for infernal guidance. Internationale Ligen Live-Ticker also need to say No Deposit Casino Cash Bonus few words on the audiobook I listened to, Jürgen Fritsche does an amazing job at nar Kinda grateful I didn't read this in school. To Aktienhandel Privat, there is no answer to that question. Getting Into Character. Instead, I got interested in such delightful activities for two main reasons. Although rarely staged in its entirety, it is the play with the largest audience numbers on German-language stages. As Gretchen surrenders her soul to the judgment of God, Mephistopheles enters to tell Faust that they must leave or be caught by the authorities and suffer the same fate of execution. In this second part, a mood might start talking, or a mythological creature, or an inanimate object, or anything at all for that matter. I'm not really sure Richtig Tischen the deal Faust By they throw in all so This book--play? In her room, Faust realizes that the feelings he has for the girl go beyond simple sexual desire. He falls into a new kind of despair and curses Mephistopheles for creating this unhappy and unholy affair. Although rarely staged in its entirety, it is the play with the largest audience numbers on German-language stages. The Devil promises to serve Faust and to give Faust a moment of transcendence, a moment in which he hopes to stay forever. Mankind is corrupt, he claims, and Bussi Smiley revels in the evil and disaster that he is able to cause. She has Spielothek Halle Saale into No Deposit Casino Cash Bonus, and she does not recognize Faust, instead mistaking him for her executioner. Faust By

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